Publications

Community Needs Assessment: Understanding the Needs of Vulnerable Children and Families in the U.S. Virgin Islands Post Hurricanes Irma and Maria

The Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands (CFVI) and the Caribbean Exploratory Research Center at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVICERC) announce the release of the community needs assessment conducted over the course of 2018 to determine the status of children in the US Virgin Islands following hurricanes Irma and Maria. The assessment, a project managed through CFVI’s USVI KIDS COUNT Initiative, was specifically intended to elucidate the ongoing health, education, human services, and housing status and needs of children and families in the US Virgin Islands during this post-hurricane period.

CERC Community Needs Assessment E-Report

CERC-CFVI Community Needs Assessment Aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria- Executive Summary

Directory 

We are currently preparing for the publication of our 2018-2019 Directory of Community Organizations. If you would like your club, company or agency to be included in our index, please complete the intake form in the link below. We welcome all community serving agencies such as nonprofit organizations, rotary clubs, and day care centers.

CFVI Directory of Community Organizations Intake Form

2016-17 Directory of Community Organizations                                                                                                    Click here to access the 2016-2017 Directory of Community of Organizations.

Hard copies are available for pick up at the Community Foundation.

CFVI Newsletters

The Community News is published on a quarterly basis to keep you updated on our grant-making and to promote funding opportunities to our donor-advisors and supporters.

Reports

 

This report provides a summary of the last four years of activities and an update of the system of services and initiatives provided by various government and private agencies, either individually or collaboratively, aimed at improving outcomes for young children and their families in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

This report provides a summary of the last four years of activities and an update of the system of services and initiatives provided by various government and private agencies, either individually or collaboratively, aimed at improving outcomes for young children and their families in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

This report provides a summary of the last four years of activities and an update of the system of services and initiatives provided by various government and private agencies, either individually or collaboratively, aimed at improving outcomes for young children and their families in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Virgin Islands ECAC Strategic Plan’s mission is to develop a high-quality, coordinated, sustainable system of supports and services for young children and their families so all children begin school safe, healthy, and ready to succeed.

The primary purpose of this document is to provide guidance for implementing the Virgin Islands Department of Education’s Education and Learning Standards through developmentally appropriate practices to support children’s optimal development.

The primary purpose of this document is to provide a framework for understanding and communicating a common set of developmentally appropriate expectations for young children ages birth to three years within a context of shared responsibility and accountability for helping children meet these expectations.

Numerous indicators led the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) Early Childhood Advisory Committee (ECAC) to prioritize the development of a new professional development system, called Pathways to Excellence. The proposed policies contained in this report are responsive to emerging data about the need for a more robust, effective, and systemic approach to the training and education of early childhood professionals in the USVI, and the need for multiple pathways toward excellence in practice for this very diverse workforce.
 

The primary purpose of this document is to provide a framework for understanding and communicating a common set of developmentally appropriate expectations for young children within a context of shared responsibility and accountability for helping children meet these expectations.

Early childhood care and education programs in the Virgin Islands must address the individual needs of a diverse population of children. Children with disabilities and children who do not speak English develop best in inclusive environments, those in which early childhood teachers and caregivers welcome all children and provide flexible programming that can meet individual needs and include children with a wide range of backgrounds and abilities.

The purpose of this research was to begin to survey the landscape of early care and education (ECE) settings in the USVI with the hopes of informing interventions to strengthen the overall quality of the sector.

Website

Special thanks to Fintrac, Ryan Moron, Kelly O’ Brien Uszenski and Don Hebert for their contribution and continuing support of our website.